Mile High Edibles

I love smoking weed and I love to eat. But eating weed is not something I know much about. So for this Colorado edition, I wanted to consult a couple friends who are very knowledgeable about edibles. Ali Stone is a Mockingbird Foundation Ambassador based in Denver and Elise McRoberts works in the cannabis industry in San Francisco. Check out their tips below and find them on Twitter. 

4 Tips for Consuming THC Edibles @elisemcroberts

  1. Read the label and follow the instructions. If you’re brand new to edibles, don’t buy a high dose product. I’ve yet to meet a newbie who can accurately dose themselves and wait long enough so it kicks in before eating more. Almost everyone eats the whole chocolate bar and then wonders why they got too high. That’s like drinking the whole handle of booze- don’t do it.
  2. Microdosing. Start with a quality branded product like KIVA. They’re known for their precise dosage and predictable effects and with options like 2.5 petramints and 5mg terrabites you can’t go wrong. Just start with ONE!

  3. A great starting dose for anyone is 2.5 – 5 milligrams of THC. Eating cannabis affects everyone differently. Metabolism, diet, body mass and weight all play part in your experience; most importantly, everyone has their own endocannabinoid system in their body which interacts with the cannabinoids. It’s best to start small and be patient. When you find your right dose and product you like, make a note of it!

  4. Lay off the brownies. Look for clean edibles that use organic ingredients. Sugar, dairy, gluten and processed crap have no place in medicine. If it’s not good for you without cannabis in it, adding cannabis and labeling it a “medical product” does NOT mean it’s healthy.

8 Concert Ailments that can be Treated with Edibles from @IAmAStone

  1. When you’re cold – THC, CBD increase blood flow
    2. When you have (back) pain – THC, CBD, CBC reduce inflammation
    3. When you’re experiencing anxiety – CBD relieves anxiety
    4. When you have insomnia – CBN aids in sleep
    5. When you have a headache – THC, CBD, CBN and CBC help reduce or eliminate pain
    6. When you’re having stomach issues – CBD reduces contractions in the small intestines; THCv serves as an appetite suppressant; THC serves as an appetite stimulant
    7. When you want to get up – sativa strains
    8. When you want to come down – indica strains


What to Do if You Get Too Stoned at a Concert

1. Get Some Air
If you’re feeling the overwhelming effects of that edible you devoured two hours ago, it’s probably not the best idea to remain in the pit dazed and confused. Walk over to an open space where you can take a few deep breaths and sit down until you’re feeling more comfortable and less dizzy.
2. Drink Some Lemon Juice
If you happen to have an overly intense reaction to the THC, drink a glass of freshly squeezed lemonade. The terpenes in lemons may reduce and alleviate the effects of THC on the brain. If you can, toss the peel of the lemon into your drink.
3. Listen to Your Friends
Bring your wingman/wingwoman with you if you know you’re going to be consuming at the concert just to be safe. It’s a smart idea to attend the concert with at least one friend who will remain sober and can think logically if things get a little out of control.
4. Take an Ibuprofen
Studies suggest that ibuprofen can help you feel noticeably less high. Ibuprofen affects the same receptors in the brain as THC, suppressing some of the less desirable side effects THC can have on your cognitive ability. Take it with plenty of water.
5. Bring Some Peppercorns or Another Peppery Snack
Black pepper contains beta-caryophyllene, which can affect cannabinoid receptors in the brain and work synergistically with cannabis’ THC to quell panic and anxiety.
6. Don’t be Afraid to Seek Medical Attention
If you start to feel dizzy, lightheaded, or worse and the above tips don’t help, you should immediately stop consuming and seek medical attention.

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